1. In 2008 Yahoo fought the NSA to avoid becoming part of the PRISM program. They eventually lost their court battle, and at one point were threatened with a $250,000 a day fine if they continued to resist. I am continually amazed at the extent of the government coercion.

    (Source: azspot)

     
  2. aka14kgold:

    The NFL continues to be the world’s most valuable athletics league, raking in an estimated $9 billion in revenue last year.

    It also happens to be a nonprofit.

    In response to the league’s controversial handling of video footage showing NFL player Ray Rice physically assaulting his then-fiancée, Janay Palmer, Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) introduced a bill on Tuesday that would remove the NFL’s tax-exempt status and allocate those funds toward domestic abuse prevention programs instead, according to NJ.com.

    "Stopping domestic violence is a national priority that requires long-term, meaningful investment,” Booker said in a statement, Politico reported. “This common sense update to our tax laws would save more than $100 million over 10 years — money that can instead be used to pay for vital support programs that have seen their funding slashed in recent years due to sequestration and gridlock.”

    Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.) wants the tax exemption gone, too, but for a different reason: The league’s refusal to make owner Dan Snyder drop the derogatory term “R[edacted]” from the Washington, D.C., team. On Tuesday, Sen. Cantwell also announced a plan to introduce legislation that would eliminate tax exemption for the NFL, saying the league “needs to join the rest of Americans in the 21st century,” The Washington Post reported.

    Sen. Tom Coburn (R-Okla.) isn’t satisfied with the status quo, either.

    "Taxpayers are losing $10 million a year subsidizing these tax loopholes for professional sports leagues that generate billions of dollars annually in profits,” Sen. Coburn told CNBC on Saturday. He sponsored 2013’s “PRO Sports Act,” which would repeal tax-exempt status for certain professional sports leagues. The bill is currently in the Finance Committee.

    The league’s classification as a nonprofit may spark some to question how, exactly, that can be, when NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell earned a reported $44.2 million in 2012, according to NJ.com.

    Wait.

    What the fuck. Why the hell is a professional, profitable, utterly socially unnecessary SPORTS CONGLOMERATE non-profit??

    (Source: veruca-assault, via randomactsofchaos)

     
  3. missfolly:

    Indian Areca Nut Cutters - Unknown / n.d.
     
  4. (Source: misandryandmakeup)

     
  5. mattblairca:

This sign is accurate.

At Cardinal Rule you say? This is so enticing. I am considering putting pants on just for this.

    mattblairca:

    This sign is accurate.

    At Cardinal Rule you say? This is so enticing. I am considering putting pants on just for this.

     
  6. bankuei:

    hipsterlibertarian:

    This is so, so creepy:

    The Department of Justice is launching a new program today in partnership with the White House, the Department of Homeland Security, and the National Counterterrorism Center that will train “community leaders” like teachers and social workers to monitor their communities for signs of radicalization. If the trainees think they have observed burgeoning radicalism, they are to report the potentially radicalized person(s) to law enforcement so the government can intervene before any crime has been committed.

    In his announcement of the initiative, Attorney General Eric Holder described the program as a way to “be both innovative and aggressive in countering violent extremism and combating those who would sow intolerance, division, and hate” in the homeland. He labeled it an expansion of existent efforts to “to identify threats before they emerge, to disrupt homegrown terrorists, and to apprehend would-be violent extremists.” Presumably this is only a stop-gap program until precogs can be developed for war on terror use.

    - - Bonnie Kristian

    Since they haven’t bothered rounding up the Stormfront crowd, the Minutemen shooting immigrants, or the police killing Black folks everyday, I guess we can figure out what counts as “radical” or “extremist”…

     
  7. allthecanadianpolitics:

    Question Period, September 18th, 2014: A Summary

    As always you can follow me here

     
  8. jss:

    owning-my-truth:

    rubyvroom:

    Sorry for the extremely lengthy post on your dashes but this is so important

    SHARE THIS!

    I was watching this tweeting happen in real time and just sat with my mouth open. This is SO. IMPORTANT.

    (via irish-mexi)

     
  9. badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista:

    (Thanks to bad-dominicana for posting this on her twitter, which got my attention).

    Check this out…

    (via randomactsofchaos)

     
  10.  
  11. "In 2014, the government… was given the chance to make history," he said, "but instead, chose to repeat the mistakes of history."

    The government, he said “has created a regime which will hurt communities, and is contrary to public interest, as it will push sex workers back into dangerous street forums.”

    When Independent Liberal Senator George Baker asked if the bill could be amended, he was unequivocal: “No.”

    As a constitutional lawyer, he said, he’d “have a field day” with the bill, given what he sees as irreconcilable inconsistencies between the objectives, as laid out in the preamble, and the text of the proposed laws.

    "You’ve got to look to see whether the text of the legislation supports the rhetoric, and it doesn’t," he stressed.

    "You’re still debating if sex work is legal or illegal, based on this legislation," he pointed out. "You should know that by opening the first page."

    Young also challenged the assertion that the government had struck the appropriate balance in crafting the new rules.

    "How can you even talk about ‘balance’ when you use the word ‘asymmetrical,’" he wondered.

    "I’ve never seen anything in the history of criminal law that sets up asymmetrical prohibitions … You’ve actually just legalized entrapment."

     
  12. allthecanadianpolitics:

Tory staffer fired after supporting inquiry into missing and murdered Aboriginal women

A Manitoba Conservative staffer who expressed support for a missing women’s inquiry was fired for voicing a viewpoint that veered from the party line on the issue. 
Spencer Fernando, a member of the Progressive Conservative caucus in Manitoba, had recently attended a vigil for 15-year-old Aboriginal girl Tina Fontaine, whose body was found wrapped in a bag and dumped in the Red River in Winnipeg in August. Her death sparked outcry and renewed calls for an inquiry into the nation’s 1,181 missing or murdered Aboriginal women. 
"I heard a lot of people discussing the need for an inquiry. You could feel the emotion in their voices…so I felt compelled to share my own thoughts," he told the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network. 
Fernando said he wasn’t necessarily fired by the Conservatives for his blog post, but that the party was not happy about him expressing his views about the matter. 
"The concern was, that as a member of the caucus staff, I should not be taking policy positions publicly." 
Statistics show that Aboriginal women are disproportionately affected by violent crime, despite the fact that Aboriginal people are only 4.3 per cent of the national population. In Saskatchewan, 55 per cent of the female murder victims from 1980-2012 were Aboriginal (see RCMP report for further statistics). In Ferndando’s home province of Manitoba, Aborignal women comprised 49 per cent of female murder victims, despite comprising just 16.7 per cent of the total Manitoban population.
Aboriginal women are not only more likely to be killed, but also 3.5 times more likely to experience violence than non-Aboriginal women in Canada. 
Fernando’s blog post said an inquiry would not only bring causes of violence against Aboriginal women to light, but show that government viewed Indigenous women as “worthy of national attention”. 
Excerpts from his blog: 

The fact is that this is an ongoing problem. So it’s not enough to investigate deaths after they happen. We need to find a way to prevent the deaths from happening, and an inquiry could help achieve that goal.
A public inquiry would accomplish something else of importance as well. It would send a clear message that the issue of missing and murdered Indigenous women is seen as worthy of national attention.
Injustice and despair thrives in the shadows. An inquiry could bring these things into the light. An inquiry would send a message that, while we can’t change our past, we are willing to learn from it.
Yes, an inquiry could bring up some dark truths. Yet, by facing those truths with clear eyes and open hearts, we can learn, grow, and respond together, as one nation.
I believe that Canada will not achieve our full potential until all who live within our borders feel respected and valued, and feel like an equal part of our Canadian family.
A public inquiry would be an important step along the road to healing, and greater security for all. That is why I support a public inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women.

Fernando is not the only Conservative-aligned voice calling for more action on missing Aboriginal women in Canada. Although not part of the party, Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall — described as the Conservative movement’s ‘best communicator’ — has also expressed his support for an inquiry into missing and murdered women. See more here. 

    allthecanadianpolitics:

    Tory staffer fired after supporting inquiry into missing and murdered Aboriginal women

    A Manitoba Conservative staffer who expressed support for a missing women’s inquiry was fired for voicing a viewpoint that veered from the party line on the issue. 

    Spencer Fernando, a member of the Progressive Conservative caucus in Manitoba, had recently attended a vigil for 15-year-old Aboriginal girl Tina Fontaine, whose body was found wrapped in a bag and dumped in the Red River in Winnipeg in August. Her death sparked outcry and renewed calls for an inquiry into the nation’s 1,181 missing or murdered Aboriginal women. 

    "I heard a lot of people discussing the need for an inquiry. You could feel the emotion in their voices…so I felt compelled to share my own thoughts," he told the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network. 

    Fernando said he wasn’t necessarily fired by the Conservatives for his blog post, but that the party was not happy about him expressing his views about the matter. 

    "The concern was, that as a member of the caucus staff, I should not be taking policy positions publicly." 

    Statistics show that Aboriginal women are disproportionately affected by violent crime, despite the fact that Aboriginal people are only 4.3 per cent of the national population. In Saskatchewan, 55 per cent of the female murder victims from 1980-2012 were Aboriginal (see RCMP report for further statistics). In Ferndando’s home province of Manitoba, Aborignal women comprised 49 per cent of female murder victims, despite comprising just 16.7 per cent of the total Manitoban population.

    Aboriginal women are not only more likely to be killed, but also 3.5 times more likely to experience violence than non-Aboriginal women in Canada. 

    Fernando’s blog post said an inquiry would not only bring causes of violence against Aboriginal women to light, but show that government viewed Indigenous women as “worthy of national attention”. 

    Excerpts from his blog: 

    The fact is that this is an ongoing problem. So it’s not enough to investigate deaths after they happen. We need to find a way to prevent the deaths from happening, and an inquiry could help achieve that goal.

    A public inquiry would accomplish something else of importance as well. It would send a clear message that the issue of missing and murdered Indigenous women is seen as worthy of national attention.

    Injustice and despair thrives in the shadows. An inquiry could bring these things into the light. An inquiry would send a message that, while we can’t change our past, we are willing to learn from it.

    Yes, an inquiry could bring up some dark truths. Yet, by facing those truths with clear eyes and open hearts, we can learn, grow, and respond together, as one nation.

    I believe that Canada will not achieve our full potential until all who live within our borders feel respected and valued, and feel like an equal part of our Canadian family.

    A public inquiry would be an important step along the road to healing, and greater security for all. That is why I support a public inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women.


    Fernando is not the only Conservative-aligned voice calling for more action on missing Aboriginal women in Canada. Although not part of the party, Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall — described as the Conservative movement’s ‘best communicator’ — has also expressed his support for an inquiry into missing and murdered women. 

    See more here. 

     
  13. allthecanadianpolitics:

    n0rthof60:

    shychemist:

    allthecanadianpolitics:

    Question period: September 16th, 2014: A summary.

    Some of my tweets are mixed in with others from twitter.

    The current state of canadian politics. Its so sad its funny.

    I love what Twitter has done for social commentary on question period. This is fantastic!

    Thank you. I’m glad you guys like it.

    I’ll continue my ‘coverage’ of twitter social commentary for future question periods. :)

     
  14. huffingtonpost:

    It was a moment Anthony Carbajal will never forget: standing on the stage of one of TV’s most popular talk shows, fighting for a cause that touches him and his family profoundly. All while his mom looked proudly on.

    Watch Anthony and Ellen do the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge and see the full interview here.

    (via shychemist)

     
  15. micdotcom:

Rihanna destroyed CBS’ attitude towards domestic abuse in 2 tweets 

Rihanna is not happy with CBS’s decision to cancel her performance before last week’s Thursday Night Football game between the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Baltimore Ravens. 
Sensing that an appearance by the singer — who was the victim of a highly publicized domestic abuse incident herself — might bring them some bad press in the wake of the Ray Rice domestic abuse scandal, the network decided to scrap her show. Rihanna wasn’t pleased
"The audacity" is right.

    micdotcom:

    Rihanna destroyed CBS’ attitude towards domestic abuse in 2 tweets 

    Rihanna is not happy with CBS’s decision to cancel her performance before last week’s Thursday Night Football game between the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Baltimore Ravens. 

    Sensing that an appearance by the singer — who was the victim of a highly publicized domestic abuse incident herself — might bring them some bad press in the wake of the Ray Rice domestic abuse scandal, the network decided to scrap her show. Rihanna wasn’t pleased

    "The audacity" is right.

    (via apsies)