1. realcleverscience:

wildcat2030:


The ‘chemputer’ that could print out any drug
When Lee Cronin learned about the concept of 3D printers, he had a brilliant idea: why not turn such a device into a universal chemistry set that could make its own drugs?

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Professor Lee Cronin is a likably impatient presence, a one-man catalyst. “I just want to get stuff done fast,” he says. And: “I am a control freak in rehab.” Cronin, 39, is the leader of a world-class team of 45 researchers at Glasgow University, primarily making complex molecules. But that is not the extent of his ambition. A couple of years ago, at a TED conference, he described one goal as the creation of “inorganic life”, and went on to detail his efforts to generate “evolutionary algorithms” in inert matter. He still hopes to “create life” in the next year or two. At the same time, one branch of that thinking has itself evolved into a new project: the notion of creating downloadable chemistry, with the ultimate aim of allowing people to “print” their own pharmaceuticals at home. Cronin’s latest TED talk asked the question: “Could we make a really cool universal chemistry set? Can we ‘app’ chemistry?” “Basically,” he tells me, in his office at the university, with half a grin, “what Apple did for music, I’d like to do for the discovery and distribution of prescription drugs.” (via The ‘chemputer’ that could print out any drug | Science | The Observer)

Yes!!!!!!!!! 3DP is amazing enough! Then they started printing organs! Then buildings! Now this! I love where this is going!… star trek matter materializers? =D

    realcleverscience:

    wildcat2030:

    The ‘chemputer’ that could print out any drug

    When Lee Cronin learned about the concept of 3D printers, he had a brilliant idea: why not turn such a device into a universal chemistry set that could make its own drugs?

    -

    Professor Lee Cronin is a likably impatient presence, a one-man catalyst. “I just want to get stuff done fast,” he says. And: “I am a control freak in rehab.” Cronin, 39, is the leader of a world-class team of 45 researchers at Glasgow University, primarily making complex molecules. But that is not the extent of his ambition. A couple of years ago, at a TED conference, he described one goal as the creation of “inorganic life”, and went on to detail his efforts to generate “evolutionary algorithms” in inert matter. He still hopes to “create life” in the next year or two. At the same time, one branch of that thinking has itself evolved into a new project: the notion of creating downloadable chemistry, with the ultimate aim of allowing people to “print” their own pharmaceuticals at home. Cronin’s latest TED talk asked the question: “Could we make a really cool universal chemistry set? Can we ‘app’ chemistry?” “Basically,” he tells me, in his office at the university, with half a grin, “what Apple did for music, I’d like to do for the discovery and distribution of prescription drugs.” (via The ‘chemputer’ that could print out any drug | Science | The Observer)

    Yes!!!!!!!!! 3DP is amazing enough! Then they started printing organs! Then buildings! Now this! I love where this is going!… star trek matter materializers? =D

     
  2. nhaler:

nevver:

Shades of Grey Are the Devil’s Favorite Colors

Yes they are.
     
  3. plantedcity:

    From Bill Moyers:

    The country’s best opportunity to mitigate climate change came three years ago, soon after President Barack Obama took office, with a friendly Democratic Senate and House of Representatives. The American Clean Energy and Security Act (otherwise known as Waxman-Markey, after its sponsors) passed the House – barely.

    It later failed in the Senate, punted along until it was eventually abandoned in July 2010. Since then, our elected officials have largely ignored the heat-trapping gases causing enormous disruptions across the planet.

    The 2009 bill saw lobbying efforts unlike anything we’ve ever seen before. Environmental groups pushing for the legislation, including the Nature Conservancy and the Environmental Defense Fund, spent a record $24.6 million lobbying in 2009, employing nearly 500 lobbyists in their hefty effort.

    But even that kind of cash was grossly outmatched by the oil and gas industry, which also had a record spending year in lobbying: $175 million and 807 lobbyists. No wonder the bill didn’t stand a chance.

    No piece of legislation since Waxman-Markey has been anywhere near as comprehensive in lowering carbon emissions. And smaller efforts have been decimated by the oil and gas industry’s influence on Capitol Hill. Take a recent vote to end $24 billion in tax breaks for big oil companies. 43 Senate Republicans and four Democrats filibustered to block the bill. All told, the 51 senators in favor of ending subsidies had received a paltry $5.9 million in career contributions from oil and gas. The 47 who protected the subsidies got $23.5 million.

    Check out the rest of the article here.

    Related:

    (Image sources: Will Blog for Food; Carbon Tracker Initiative)

     
  4. theclearlydope:

That’s always my response in job interviews when they bring up the strengths and weaknesses.
imwithkanye:

Weaknesses. [via]

    theclearlydope:

    That’s always my response in job interviews when they bring up the strengths and weaknesses.

    imwithkanye:

    Weaknesses. [via]

     
  5. magnolius:

    New Work by Banksy

    Police in London have been fighting a battle with graffiti artists in an attempt to clean up the city for the Olympic games this summer. In recent times it has been common to hear of graffiti artists homes being raided, some of which haven’t spray painted in over 15 years but their marks are still scattered throughout the capital. This recent crack down hasn’t seemed to of effected Banksy much. This morning Banksy posted two new pieces of work which seem to give his personal take on the games.  

    (Source: machine-factory)