1. (Source: ipu-m, via ravingsofabitch)

     
  2. D&D Stats Explained with Tomatoes

    twistedviper:

    raktajino-hot:

    corruptionpoints:

    mindchildofmadness submits:

    Strength is being able to crush a tomato.

    Dexterity is being able to dodge a tomato.

    Constitution is being able to eat a bad tomato.

    Intelligence is knowing a tomato is a fruit.

    Wisdom is knowing not to put a tomato in a fruit salad.

    Charisma is being able to sell a tomato based fruit salad.

    (Source)

    image

    If I stop reblogging this assume I’m dead

    (via apoplecticskeptic)

     
  3. 10 things you need to know about sick leave in the federal public service

    cdnpoli:

    As they get ready to bargain with federal public sector unions, which together represent around 200,000 workers, the Harper Conservatives have been spreading a lot of misinformation about the sick leave system in the public service in order to set the context for the introduction of a private, for profit insurance scheme that will only benefit big insurance corporations.

    1. Tony Clement can’t be trusted on how much sick leave public service workers use.

    Treasury Board president Tony Clement has repeatedly made the dubious claim that public service workers take an average of 18.2 days of sick leave per year even though they only get 15 sick days each year. The independent Parliamentary Budget Officer (PBO), however, used Treasury Board’s own numbers to estimate that the average number of paid sick days taken by public sector workers is closer to 11.5. And there’s more: the PBO says that even this lower figure comes with many caveats, so the actual number is likely even lower

    Clement gives the impression that there’s some kind of free for all in the public service, with workers taking sick days indiscriminately. But this is simply wrong: every hour of sick leave taken by a public service worker must be approved by management.

    2. It’s not true that public service workers take way more sick leave than private sector workers.

    The Harper government likes to claim that public service workers abuse sick leave but, in September 2013, Statistics Canada issued a study that compared absenteeism in the public and private sectors and found that when adjusted for unionization, age and gender, the gap in the number of sick days used amounts to around a day per year.

    3. Sick leave helps ensure productivity and helps avoid spreading diseases like mono, flu, avian flu, SARS, H1N1, and whatever comes after H1N1.

    Paid sick leave provisions enhance overall productivity by ensuring that workers who are sick with colds and flus don’t come in to work and spread it to other workers. To the Conservatives out there, it’s good for the economy!

    4. Sick leave is NOT cashable.

    Unused sick leave accumulates each year but, contrary to media and government claims, is in no way cashable upon retirement or departure from the public service. Sick leave that is not used by the time a public service worker quits or retires is lost, not cashed out.

    5. How can sick leave cost the government $5 billion if employees can’t cash it out?

    Tony Clement claims that accumulated sick leave days represent over $5 billion in liability to the government. This is utter nonsense: most public service workers have many unused sick days when they quit or retire, and this does not cost the government anything. Again, sick leave is not cashable.

    UPDATE: In July 2014, the Office of the Parliamentary Budget Officer (PBO) concluded that there is virtually no incremental cost to government (and taxpayers) stemming from the federal public service sick leave system.

    6. The current system should be improved for young workers, not destroyed.

    Young public service workers tend not to fall sick very often and so can accumulate their sick days for use when they are older and more likely to fall ill. Sometimes, however, young people do become seriously ill or suffer a major trauma like a concussion from a sport. In such cases, they may have to stay off work for months but would possibly not have enough sick days accumulated to cover the 13 week period before long term disability insurance kicks in.

    Both the unions and the government agree that this is a problem, but the solution is not to get rid of the current sick leave system and replace it with a private short term disability plan, as Tony Clement has suggested. In fact, making young workers, who as a whole don’t take much sick leave, pay premiums to an insurance company in order to cover the more frequent sick leave of older workers, also seems problematic.

    There are other solutions, though—for example, ‘sick day loans’. If the banks can lend you money to buy a house, surely your employer can lend you sick days with the expectation that you’ll be back at work. In fact, at the discretion of managers, this is already currently possible in the public service. 

    7. Sick leave is a NEGOTIATED benefit.

    The current sick leave system didn’t just happen—it was negotiated by members of federal unions such as PSAC, CAPE and PIPSC, in previous rounds of bargaining. And like other non-monetary benefits in collective agreements, it was agreed to in exchange for other things, such as withdrawing demands for wage increases during recessionary periods. If the Conservatives want to change the sick leave system, they need to negotiate with unions and not legislate changes, as many suspect they will try to do.

    8. Unions will not back down.

    Federal public service unions will reject the change to the private plan. PSAC, the largest of the unions, with well over 100,000 members working in the core public service, has said that it will not negotiate away the current sick leave system for the weaker, privately managed, for profit system that the government is pushing.

    9. If the government has its way, insurance companies will be the only winners.

    The government’s plan to get rid of sick leave and replace it with a private, for profit, short-term disability (STD) insurance plan is good….for big insurance corporations, which stand to win a massive contract. Indeed, STDs are never good for flesh and blood persons, and this one will cost public service workers more in insurance premiums and involve more time-wasting paperwork. Every time a worker is sick, even if for only a day, the insurance company will demand all sorts of paperwork before it issues a cheque to cover lost wages. This will have the effect of dissuading workers from staying home when sick.

    10. Like in New York City, sick leave should be extended to all.

    In 2014, New York City passed a law expanding paid sick leave to workers in all businesses with more than five employees. Today, any employee working for a business of this size can take up to five paid sick days off per year without fear of losing their jobs. In fact, workers can even use their paid sick days to take care of family members, including grandparents, grandchildren and siblings. Why don’t governments in Canada take inspiration from this and pass laws to ensure sick leave for all workers rather than attacking the negotiated sick leave of workers who deliver important public services?

     
  4.  
  5. the-feature:

    Antioxidant vitamins don’t stress us like plants do — and don’t have their beneficial effect.

     
  6. coffeewithajla:

    "Remember that in racist, demographics obsessed Israel, the most fearsome "existential threat" is the birth of a Palestinian child."

    (via randomactsofchaos)

     
  7. One Of World’s Most Endangered Forests Set To Be Demolished To Build Wal-Mart Supercenter

    addictinginfo:

    One Of World’s Most Endangered Forests Set To Be Demolished To Build Wal-Mart Supercenter

    florida-forest

    A pristine patch of Florida forest, the home to dozens of animals species that biologists say are found no where else on the planet, will be bulldozed to make room for a Wal-Mart shopping center.

    The 88 acres of rockland was sold by the University of Miami to a developer working for Wal-Mart who plans to build the retail store as well as a Chick-fil-A and Chili’s restaurant. As a concession the…

    View On WordPress

    (via randomactsofchaos)

     
  8. Addressing reporters at a press conference on Sunday, Youssef Abul Resh, undersecretary of the health ministry in Gaza said, “Medical teams have registered injuries consistent with those caused by DIME [dense inert metal explosives] and other banned weapons.”

    (Source: azspot)

     
  9. america-wakiewakie:

Those Kids Crossing the Border From Mexico Wouldn’t Be There If Obama Hadn’t Supported a Coup the Media Doesn’t Talk About | Common Dreams
If you’re reading this, you probably follow the news. So you’ve probably heard of the latest iteration of the “crisis at the border”: tens of thousands of children, many of them unaccompanied by an adult, crossing the desert from Mexico into the United States, where they surrender to the Border Patrol in hope of being allowed to remain here permanently. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s detention and hearing system has been overwhelmed by the surge of children and, in some cases, their parents. The Obama Administration has asked Congress to approve new funding to speed up processing and deportations of these illegal immigrants.
Even if you’ve followed this story closely, you probably haven’t heard the depressing backstory — the reason so many Central Americans are sending their children on a dangerous thousand-mile journey up the spine of Mexico, where they ride atop freight trains, endure shakedowns by corrupt police and face rapists, bandits and other predators. (For a sense of what it’s like, check out the excellent 2004 film “Maria Full of Grace.”)
NPR and other mainstream news outlets are parroting the White House, which blames unscrupulous “coyotes” (human smugglers) for “lying to parents, telling them that if they put their kids in the hands of traffickers and get to the United States that they will be able to stay.” True: the coyotes are saying that in order to gin up business. Also true: U.S. law has changed, and many of these kids have a strong legal case for asylum. Unfortunately, U.S. officials are ignoring the law.
The sad truth is that this “crisis at the border” is yet another example of “blowback.”
Blowback is an unintended negative consequence of U.S. political, military and/or economic intervention overseas — when something we did in the past comes back to bite us in the ass.9/11 is the classic example; arming and funding radical Islamists in the Middle East and South Asia who were less grateful for our help than angry at the U.S.’ simultaneous backing for oppressive governments (The House of Saud, Saddam, Assad, etc.) in the region.
More recent cases include U.S. support for Islamist insurgents in Libya and Syria, which destabilized both countries and led to the murders of U.S. consular officials in Benghazi, and the rise of ISIS, the guerilla army that imperils the U.S.-backed Maliki regime in Baghdad, respectively.
Confusing the issue for casual American news consumers is that the current border crisis doesn’t involve the usual Mexicans traveling north in search of work. Instead, we’re talking about people from Central American nations devastated by a century of American colonialism and imperialism, much of that intervention surprisingly recent. Central American refugees are merely transiting through Mexico.
"The unaccompanied children crossing the border into the United States are leaving behind mainly three Central American countries, Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala. The first two are among the world’s most violent and all three have deep poverty, according to a Pew Research report based on Department of Homeland Security (DHS) information,” reports NBC News. “El Salvador ranked second in terms of homicides in Latin America in 2011, and it is still high on the list. Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador are among the poorest nations in Latin America. Thirty percent of Hondurans, 17 percent of Salvadorans and 26 percent of Guatemalans live on less than $2 a day.”
The fact that Honduras is the biggest source of the exodus jumped out at me. That’s because, in 2009, the United States government — under President Obama — tacitly supported a military coup that overthrew the democratically elected president of Honduras. “Washington has a very close relationship with the Honduran military, which goes back decades,” The Guardian noted at the time. “During the 1980s, the US used bases in Honduras to train and arm the Contras, Nicaraguan paramilitaries who became known for their atrocities in their war against the Sandinista government in neighbouring Nicaragua.”
Honduras wasn’t paradise under President Manuel Zelaya. Since the coup, however, the country has entered a downward death spiral of drug-related bloodshed and political revenge killings that crashed the economy, brought an end to law, order and civil society, and now has some analysts calling it a “failed state” along the lines of Somalia and Afghanistan during the 1990s.
"Zelaya’s overthrow created a vacuum in security in which military and police were now focused more on political protest, and also led to a freeze in international aid that markedly worsened socio-economic conditions," Mark Ungar, professor of political science at Brooklyn College and the City University of New York, told The International Business Times. “The 2009 coup, asserts [Tulane] professor Aaron Schneider, gave the Honduran military more political and economic leverage, at the same time as the state and political elites lost their legitimacy, resources and the capacity to govern large parts of the country.”
El Salvador and Guatemala, also narcostates devastated by decades of U.S. support for oppressive, corrupt right-wing dictatorships, are suffering similar conditions.
(Photo Credit: AP | Supporters of ousted Honduras’ President Manuel Zelaya clash with soldiers near the presidential residency Tegucigalpa, Monday, June 29. 2009. Police fired tear gas to hold back thousands of Hondurans outside the occupied presidential residency as world leaders appealed to Honduras to reverse a coup that ousted the president.)

    america-wakiewakie:

    Those Kids Crossing the Border From Mexico Wouldn’t Be There If Obama Hadn’t Supported a Coup the Media Doesn’t Talk About | Common Dreams

    If you’re reading this, you probably follow the news. So you’ve probably heard of the latest iteration of the “crisis at the border”: tens of thousands of children, many of them unaccompanied by an adult, crossing the desert from Mexico into the United States, where they surrender to the Border Patrol in hope of being allowed to remain here permanently. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s detention and hearing system has been overwhelmed by the surge of children and, in some cases, their parents. The Obama Administration has asked Congress to approve new funding to speed up processing and deportations of these illegal immigrants.

    Even if you’ve followed this story closely, you probably haven’t heard the depressing backstory — the reason so many Central Americans are sending their children on a dangerous thousand-mile journey up the spine of Mexico, where they ride atop freight trains, endure shakedowns by corrupt police and face rapists, bandits and other predators. (For a sense of what it’s like, check out the excellent 2004 film “Maria Full of Grace.”)

    NPR and other mainstream news outlets are parroting the White House, which blames unscrupulous “coyotes” (human smugglers) for “lying to parents, telling them that if they put their kids in the hands of traffickers and get to the United States that they will be able to stay.” True: the coyotes are saying that in order to gin up business. Also true: U.S. law has changed, and many of these kids have a strong legal case for asylum. Unfortunately, U.S. officials are ignoring the law.

    The sad truth is that this “crisis at the border” is yet another example of “blowback.”

    Blowback is an unintended negative consequence of U.S. political, military and/or economic intervention overseas — when something we did in the past comes back to bite us in the ass.9/11 is the classic example; arming and funding radical Islamists in the Middle East and South Asia who were less grateful for our help than angry at the U.S.’ simultaneous backing for oppressive governments (The House of Saud, Saddam, Assad, etc.) in the region.

    More recent cases include U.S. support for Islamist insurgents in Libya and Syria, which destabilized both countries and led to the murders of U.S. consular officials in Benghazi, and the rise of ISIS, the guerilla army that imperils the U.S.-backed Maliki regime in Baghdad, respectively.

    Confusing the issue for casual American news consumers is that the current border crisis doesn’t involve the usual Mexicans traveling north in search of work. Instead, we’re talking about people from Central American nations devastated by a century of American colonialism and imperialism, much of that intervention surprisingly recent. Central American refugees are merely transiting through Mexico.

    "The unaccompanied children crossing the border into the United States are leaving behind mainly three Central American countries, Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala. The first two are among the world’s most violent and all three have deep poverty, according to a Pew Research report based on Department of Homeland Security (DHS) information,” reports NBC News. “El Salvador ranked second in terms of homicides in Latin America in 2011, and it is still high on the list. Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador are among the poorest nations in Latin America. Thirty percent of Hondurans, 17 percent of Salvadorans and 26 percent of Guatemalans live on less than $2 a day.”

    The fact that Honduras is the biggest source of the exodus jumped out at me. That’s because, in 2009, the United States government — under President Obama — tacitly supported a military coup that overthrew the democratically elected president of Honduras. “Washington has a very close relationship with the Honduran military, which goes back decades,” The Guardian noted at the time. “During the 1980s, the US used bases in Honduras to train and arm the Contras, Nicaraguan paramilitaries who became known for their atrocities in their war against the Sandinista government in neighbouring Nicaragua.”

    Honduras wasn’t paradise under President Manuel Zelaya. Since the coup, however, the country has entered a downward death spiral of drug-related bloodshed and political revenge killings that crashed the economy, brought an end to law, order and civil society, and now has some analysts calling it a “failed state” along the lines of Somalia and Afghanistan during the 1990s.

    "Zelaya’s overthrow created a vacuum in security in which military and police were now focused more on political protest, and also led to a freeze in international aid that markedly worsened socio-economic conditions," Mark Ungar, professor of political science at Brooklyn College and the City University of New York, told The International Business Times. “The 2009 coup, asserts [Tulane] professor Aaron Schneider, gave the Honduran military more political and economic leverage, at the same time as the state and political elites lost their legitimacy, resources and the capacity to govern large parts of the country.”

    El Salvador and Guatemala, also narcostates devastated by decades of U.S. support for oppressive, corrupt right-wing dictatorships, are suffering similar conditions.

    (Photo Credit: AP | Supporters of ousted Honduras’ President Manuel Zelaya clash with soldiers near the presidential residency Tegucigalpa, Monday, June 29. 2009. Police fired tear gas to hold back thousands of Hondurans outside the occupied presidential residency as world leaders appealed to Honduras to reverse a coup that ousted the president.)

    (via bohemianarthouse)

     
  10. onthemedia:

WHAT CAN WE LEARN ABOUT THE INTERNET FROM THE DISASTROUS DASHCON CONVENTION LAST WEEKEND?
Fandom works precisely because it has no leaders. People feed off one another’s creativity and energy, and you don’t need anyone’s permission to squirrel your own stories away on your Tumblr. They are yours and they are everyone’s. No one’s asking permission, no one’s organizing them beyond a few hashtags, and no one is “responsible” with keeping the fandom running smoothly. 
But to create an event, one that exists in the world, and requires transactions (both socially and monetarily), well, fandom doesn’t necessarily equip one to be able to pull that off. It feels like the DashCon organizers were faced with an event that they willed into being, and then required maintenance, follow-through, and organization. And it fell apart.

    onthemedia:

    WHAT CAN WE LEARN ABOUT THE INTERNET FROM THE DISASTROUS DASHCON CONVENTION LAST WEEKEND?

    Fandom works precisely because it has no leaders. People feed off one another’s creativity and energy, and you don’t need anyone’s permission to squirrel your own stories away on your Tumblr. They are yours and they are everyone’s. No one’s asking permission, no one’s organizing them beyond a few hashtags, and no one is “responsible” with keeping the fandom running smoothly. 

    But to create an event, one that exists in the world, and requires transactions (both socially and monetarily), well, fandom doesn’t necessarily equip one to be able to pull that off. It feels like the DashCon organizers were faced with an event that they willed into being, and then required maintenance, follow-through, and organization. And it fell apart.

    (via sugarbooty)

     
  11. sylviac:

(via Forget the Shortest Route Across a City; New Algorithm Finds the Most Beautiful | MIT Technology Review)
     
  12. letterstomycountry:

    Mainstream media outlets are reporting that Hamas has rejected a ceasefire agreement with Israel brokered by the Egyptian government. The Israeli government accepted the terms of the ceasefire, but Hamas rejected them.  This, of course, makes Hamas look even more terrible than they already are.

    But if you dig into the actual terms of the “ceasefire,” alongside the Israeli government’s history of violating previous ceasefire agreements, you realize that even a more moderate Palestinian government likely would have rejected the terms of the ceasefire.  Here is Mya Guarnieri: …

     
  13. booksandwildthings:

swagbat:

how game of thrones should end

#khal drogo just #descends from the heavens #on a flaming stallion #punches everyone in the face #and sits his fine dothraki ass down on the iron throne #until daenerys shows up #then he stands #dusts the seat off a bit #and steps aside for his khalessi

    booksandwildthings:

    swagbat:

    how game of thrones should end

    #khal drogo just #descends from the heavens #on a flaming stallion #punches everyone in the face #and sits his fine dothraki ass down on the iron throne #until daenerys shows up #then he stands #dusts the seat off a bit #and steps aside for his khalessi

    (via afternoonsnoozebutton)

     
  14. “There are 100,000 total marijuana smokers in the US, and most are Negroes, Hispanics, Filipinos and entertainers. Their Satanic music, jazz and swing, result from marijuana usage. This marijuana causes white women to seek sexual relations with Negroes, entertainers and any others.”

    “Reefer makes darkies think they’re as good as white men.”

    “…the primary reason to outlaw marijuana is its effect on the degenerate races.”

    “Marijuana is the most violence-causing drug in the history of mankind.”

    — 

    Henry Anslinger, first Commissioner of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics and chief proponent of marijuana prohibition. (via lost-and-searching-in-america)

    oh yes… the War on Drugs started out of racism— the U.S government banned opium in order to get rid of Chinese immigrant workers in the United States. The drug war has always been based on racism and pure hatred for people of color. To this day, the War on Drugs is still very much a war on POC communities.

    (via deafmuslimpunx)

    (Source: the-flame-imperishable, via sugarbooty)

     
  15. iheartmyart:


    Altaeros Energies
    ' Buoyant Wind Turbine (BAT) Floats in the Sky

    The Buoyant Wind Turbine (BAT) is designed to take advantage of high altitude winds, which are often five times greater than those found at typical wind turbine heights. Composed of an inflatable helium shell with stabilizing fins and turbine in the middle, the BAT also has the advantage of being quickly deployable, making it a potential power source for remote areas and emergency zones. The BAT, which would float about 1,000 ft. above the landscape, also addresses the noise and aesthetic concerns commonly lobbed at wind turbines. A strong cable tethers the turbine to the ground and also acts as the conduit through which electricity flows. 

    (via theenergyissue)

    (via nhaler)