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     Ontario  conservaties  liberals  ndp  election  debate 

  2. nationalpost:

Photo gallery: NDP leader Jack Layton loses battle with cancerJack Layton has lost his battle with cancer, dying Monday morning at his home, surrounded by those closest to him, his family said.Layton had recently stepped down as federal NDP leader, but had expressed hope that he would return when Parliament resumed next month. Photo: NDP leader Jack Layton serenades the media on the campaign plane, April 2, 2011. (Tobi Cohen/Postmedia News)

    nationalpost:

    Photo gallery: NDP leader Jack Layton loses battle with cancer
    Jack Layton has lost his battle with cancer, dying Monday morning at his home, surrounded by those closest to him, his family said.

    Layton had recently stepped down as federal NDP leader, but had expressed hope that he would return when Parliament resumed next month.

    Photo: NDP leader Jack Layton serenades the media on the campaign plane, April 2, 2011. (Tobi Cohen/Postmedia News)

     

     Jack Layton  NDP  New Democratic Party  politics  Canadian politics  cancer  photos  photo gallery  news 

  3. From Wayne Roberts:

    One nice thing about early posting of the fixed date for Ontario’s upcoming election (October 6, don’t you know?) is that the delay offers lots of time to dump stupidities without too many people noticing.

    The NDP would be smart to use the head start to bury their promise to phase out the harmonized sales tax on car fuel, home heating and electricity.

    […]

    In the NDP plan, Ontario residents would pay $1 billion less in energy taxes by 2015. Since the tax cut isn’t targeted, that annual billion-dollar windfall would apply equally to rich and poor – with one difference. The rich plug in more appliances, fill more tanks of oversized SUVs and heat more spacious and luxurious homes, and therefore would bag a bigger tax cut than the middle class.

    By contrast, the NDP pledge to freeze public transit fares and top up public transit operating costs – matters of greatest relevance to those facing inequity in travel costs and transit subsidies – gets budgeted little more than a third, $375 million, of the money lost to taxes on energy consumption. 

    The “you deserve a tax break today” approach to government borrows too much from ultra-conservative theory and practice. Traditionally, New Democrats identified a positive role for government, doing things for communities that individuals can’t do alone, like pooling the costs of health care, using public purchasing to encourage local sustainable farming or installing energy conservation equipment in seniors’ homes to reduce their energy bills.

    Government by tax cut reduces the power of government to fund programs in the public interest. Yet NDP tax cutters claim that an NDP government will be able to cap fuel prices set by the biggest companies in the world. Realistically, oil prices will only be capped when demand shrinks significantly thanks to either conservation or renewable fuels. 

    Energy tax cuts give no break whatsoever to those who conserve, and no premium to those who use renewable fuels. In this way, they indirectly support the high demand that keeps prices up.

     

     Ontario  politics  NDP  environment  energy  Andrea Horwath 

  4. Dale Marshall, climate change policy analyst at David Suzuki Foundation:

    Environmentally minded people and parties understand that higher energy prices can provide an additional incentive for people and businesses to conserve energy and invest in energy efficiency. Parties also understand that there’s political gold in proposing to bring down energy prices. Unfortunately, like the Ontario Progressive Conservatives, the NDP allowed politics to rule over good policy. After all, it is difficult to justify the removal of $2.8 billion in taxes on fossil fuels such as oil and gasoline. What a way to spend tax dollars!

     

     ontario  politics  environment  NDP 

  5. From CBC News:

    A rookie NDP MP who won a seat in Quebec despite being largely invisible during the five-week campaign admits she has never set foot in her riding.

    In her first media interview since being elected on Monday night, Ruth Ellen Brosseau said her victory in the southern Quebec riding of Berthier-Maskinongé came as a “shock” because she “wasn’t really expecting to win.”

    Brosseau told the Trois-Rivières newspaper Le Nouvelliste she will be visiting the riding in the next few days.

    "Unfortunately, I’ve never had the opportunity to go to the riding," Brosseau said during the interview, which was conducted mostly in English and posted online Saturday.

     

     politics  NDP  Ruth Ellen Brosseau 

  6.  

     NDP  MPs  Libby Davies  Vancouver East