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     election  Ontario  2011 

  2.  

     Ontario  conservaties  liberals  ndp  election  debate 

  3.  

     2011  Ontario  election  financial aid  students  tuition  education 

  4. Slim McGuinty lead means slim McGuinty majority - ThreeHundredEight.com

When Harris-Decima came out last week with an 11-point gap between the  Liberals and the Tories, people scoffed. Indeed, that size of margin  was, perhaps, a little on the large side, but two new polls from Ipsos-Reid and Nanos Research show the Liberals ahead, though barely. The Ipsos-Reid poll for Global TV, Newstalk 101, and The Ottawa Citizen gives the Liberals a virtually non-existent one-point lead, 38% to 37%  for the Tories. Compared to Ipsos-Reid’s “flash poll” conducted in early  August, however, there has been virtually no change. The Liberals are  up two points and the NDP one, while the Tories are down two points. All  within the margin of error. The Liberals lead primarily because of the GTA, where they have the edge  40% to 33%. They trail the Tories in most other parts of the province,  except the north. There, with a small sample size, the Liberals lead the  NDP by 44% to 30%.

    Slim McGuinty lead means slim McGuinty majority - ThreeHundredEight.com

    When Harris-Decima came out last week with an 11-point gap between the Liberals and the Tories, people scoffed. Indeed, that size of margin was, perhaps, a little on the large side, but two new polls from Ipsos-Reid and Nanos Research show the Liberals ahead, though barely.

    The Ipsos-Reid poll for Global TV, Newstalk 101, and The Ottawa Citizen gives the Liberals a virtually non-existent one-point lead, 38% to 37% for the Tories. Compared to Ipsos-Reid’s “flash poll” conducted in early August, however, there has been virtually no change. The Liberals are up two points and the NDP one, while the Tories are down two points. All within the margin of error.

    The Liberals lead primarily because of the GTA, where they have the edge 40% to 33%. They trail the Tories in most other parts of the province, except the north. There, with a small sample size, the Liberals lead the NDP by 44% to 30%.

     

     Ontario  election  2011  polls 

  5. From the Toronto Star:

    Pressing people’s buttons is unsavoury on the stump. But pulling the wool over their eyes is no less unsettling.

    Even if Tory Leader Tim Hudak has belatedly dialed down his ethnic-baiting campaign speeches, and is changing the channel back to his Changebook platform, he still has a lot of explaining to do.

    […]

    The trouble with Changebook is that it tries to buy voters with their own (tax) money, relying on gimmicks such as the DRC and HST givebacks instead of making productive investments. It hearkens back to a simpler time, pretending we can punish prisoners with a variation of chain gangs from 1950s-era Alabama.

    But Changebook goes beyond oversimplification to outright manipulation, which had escaped my notice until labour economist Jim Stanford shared his research with me the other day. Stanford is hardly a disinterested observer — he works for the Canadian Auto Workers — but he is a widely respected analyst.

    His exposé, to be released Tuesday by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (a lefty think tank), shows how the data and charts in Changebook cross the line of truthfulness and accuracy, misstating Ontario’s economic situation, hydro rate hikes and the rising debt. It documents the deception on a scale that would embarrass any first-year economics student, let alone someone like Hudak with a masters in economics.

    The graphs “consistently mislead the reader … reflect a consistent willingness to bend the statistical truth, and a disrespect for normal standards of honesty and transparency in written work,” Stanford concludes. A chart understating the economic recovery “is not just manipulative in its presentation; it is explicitly false.”

     

     Ontario  election  2011  Conservatives  Tim Hudak  Changebook 

  6. A targeted employment program does not mean that one group is more important than another; it simply acknowledges that different approaches may be necessary. Ontario already spends more than $1 billion on employment training programs for everyone. On top of that, $600 million in new programs were targeted specifically to retraining workers who lost jobs in the recession. We have programs aimed at helping low-skill workers, older workers and young workers. Tailoring a program to recent immigrants is not fundamentally different.

    […]

    But the controversy that Hudak is stirring up is not about the substance of particular policies. It’s about wedge politics. On Tuesday he claimed that the tax breaks offered by the Liberals would help companies hire “anybody but you.”

    That kind of language divides Ontarians into an “us” and a “them.” Creating divisions between struggling, unemployed workers and newer immigrants is dangerous to our long-term social cohesion. In Toronto, half of us were born outside Canada. There is no us versus them. They are us. And the faster we get newcomers into good jobs in the workforce and paying higher taxes the better for us all.

     

     Ontario  election  2011  Tim Hudak 

  7.  

     2011  Dalton McGuinty  Ontario  Tim Hudak  election  Andrea Horwath 

  8. Tim was one of ONLY 6 MPPs out of 107 to vote against the Smoke Free Ontario Law making it harder for children to buy cigarettes
    — 

    The Truth About Tim Hudak

    Source: Legislative Assembly, Transcript of Debates, Issue number L156

    via Jordan

     

     Conservatives  MPPs  Ontario  Tim Hudak  Tories  election  2011 

  9. "During her 26-year military career, Lt.-Col. Karen McCrimmon, the Liberal candidate in Carleton-Mississippi Mills, was the first woman in Canada to qualify as an air navigator and the first to command an air force squadron.” - Ottawa Citizen

It’s army versus air force in Carleton-Mississippi Mills where two retired military commanders are about to wage politics.Decorated air force pioneer Lt.-Col. Karen McCrimmon will attempt to seize the riding for the Liberals from army Brig.-Gen. Gordon O’Connor, the former defence minister who now serves as chief whip in the Conservative government.Such a high-ranking contest is unusual. Only 11 MPs in the last Parliament boasted military service — the lowest number in Canadian history — and of those, only six were officers.

    "During her 26-year military career, Lt.-Col. Karen McCrimmon, the Liberal candidate in Carleton-Mississippi Mills, was the first woman in Canada to qualify as an air navigator and the first to command an air force squadron.” - Ottawa Citizen

    It’s army versus air force in Carleton-Mississippi Mills where two retired military commanders are about to wage politics.

    Decorated air force pioneer Lt.-Col. Karen McCrimmon will attempt to seize the riding for the Liberals from army Brig.-Gen. Gordon O’Connor, the former defence minister who now serves as chief whip in the Conservative government.

    Such a high-ranking contest is unusual. Only 11 MPs in the last Parliament boasted military service — the lowest number in Canadian history — and of those, only six were officers.

     

     2011  Canada  Liberals  election  Karen McCrimmon  Ottawa 

  10. To hear Jon Corzine tell it, Meg Whitman is either deceiving us or deceiving herself. Like Whitman, the former eBay CEO who’s vying for California’s Republican gubernatorial nomination, Corzine is one of the few people in America who has tried to make the leap from running a business (in his case, Goldman Sachs) to running a government (the state of New Jersey). He can only scoff when he hears Whitman arguing that deficit-ridden California desperately needs her corporate skills. Corzine also thought “the managerial skill set would be helpful,” he tells NEWSWEEK. But after four grueling years as a Democratic governor—ending in a humiliating defeat by an uninspiring Republican opponent—Corzine no longer believes that being a CEO prepares anyone for the day-to-day grind of governing. “The idea that you’re accountable to a bottom line and to a payroll in managing a business—it gives voters the confidence that you have the right skills [to govern]. But it’s 20,000 people versus 9 million. I don’t think candidates get the scale and scope of what governing is. You don’t have the flexibility you imagined. There’s no exact translation.”
    — Romano/Hirsh on the rise of the CEO politician (via newsweek) (via think4yourself)
     

     politics  election  California  Jon Corzine  Meg Whitman