1. aidresources:

    This report attempts to capture and highlight the Federal agencies’ effort in “mainstreaming” consideration of climate change adaptation across their programs and policies and their leadership role…

     

     environment  US  public policy 

  2. From The Globe & Mail:

    While the number of HIV-AIDS cases in Canada have risen back to 1982 levels, the biggest shift is in who and where are most effected.

    Related:

    AIDS Committee of Toronto

    Ontario AIDS Network

    Toronto People With AIDS Foundation

    Smitherman slams Ford over past AIDS comments (May 2010)

    In 2006, Ford argued against a $1.5-million AIDS prevention strategy, telling council: “It is very preventable. If you are not doing needles and you are not gay, you wouldn’t get AIDS probably, that’s the bottom line.”

    Reducing HIV spread thru safe injection sites:

    On-site heroin urged for chronic addicts - CBC (May 2010)

    Vancouver’s supervised injection site providing a safe place for changing lives (interview w/ Russ Maynard, Insite’s program coordinator) (July 21, 2010)

    Safe drug injection sites reduce HIV spread - CTV (2005)

    Vancouver Coastal Health - Insite - Supervised Injection Site

    Vancouver’s INSITE service and other Supervised injection sites: What has been learned from research? - Final report of the Expert Advisory Committee, Prepared for the Hon. Tony Clement, Minister of Health (March 31, 2008)

    Injection site for Toronto under study - Toronto Star (Aug 2009)

    Do more:

    Register today for the Toronto Scotiabank AIDS Walk for Life or sponsor a walker.

     

     AIDS  Toronto  Vancouver  heroin  health  public policy  health policy 

  3. katharinec:

    The surge of gunbattles, beheadings and kidnappings that has accompanied Mexico’s war on drug cartels is an entirely predictable escalation in violence based on decades of scientific literature, a new study contends.

    A systematic review published Tuesday of more than 300 international studies dating back 20 years found that when police crack down on drug users and dealers, the result is almost always an increase in violence, say researchers at the International Centre for Science in Drug Policy, a nonprofit group based in Britain and Canada.

     

     drugs  public policy  police  violence 

  4. And even if we did have only Christians in our midst, if we expelled every non-Christian from the United States of America, whose Christianity would we teach in the schools? Would we go with James Dobson’s, or Al Sharpton’s? Which passages of Scripture should guide our public policy? Should we go with Leviticus, which suggests slavery is ok and that eating shellfish is abomination? How about Deuteronomy, which suggests stoning your child if he strays from the faith? Or should we just stick to the Sermon on the Mount - a passage that is so radical that it’s doubtful that our own Defense Department would survive its application? So before we get carried away, let’s read our bibles. Folks haven’t been reading their bibles.
    — Barack Obama (via agirlcalledchris) (via robot-heart-politics) (via chos)
     

     quotes  religion  public policy 

  5. katharinec:

    Why do the American media avoid discussing these research findings? Why are the opinions of unknowledgeable people in towns like Decatur, Georgia, and Cumberland, Maryland, more meaningful than the results of carefully conducted scientific research? Why is evidence-based medicine abandoned when it comes to drugs? Why is the existence of credible research not even mentioned? The best that was done was to mention that the director of the Insite Program believed that lives were being saved. Not mentioned was the hard scientific evidence amassed to back his position. Why does science not matter when it comes to drug policies?

    Read please.

    (h/t Addiction Inbox)

     

     public policy  public health  addiction  drugs 

  6. abcsoupdot:

    “The drug war has been brutal — complete with SWAT teams, tanks, bazookas, grenade launchers, and sweeps of entire neighborhoods — but those who live in white communities have little clue to the devastation wrought. This war has been waged almost exclusively in poor communities of color, even though studies consistently show that people of all colors use and sell illegal drugs at remarkably similar rates. In fact, some studies indicate that white youth are significantly more likely to engage in illegal drug dealing than black youth. Any notion that drug use among African Americans is more severe or dangerous is belied by the data. White youth, for example, have about three times the number of drug-related visits to the emergency room as their African American counterparts.”

    How the War on Drugs Gave Birth to a Permanent American Undercaste - RaceTalk (via tiredofbeingignored) (via clingtomymouth)

    Let’s stop for a second here - don’t white people in America outnumber black people 7-to-1? Shouldn’t then American white youth have 7 times the number of drug-related visits to the emergency as their African American counterparts - if population susceptibility is to be the same? This article doesn’t state whether it 3x as many visits per capita, or 3x as many visits overall.

    If it is indeed 3x as many visits overall, then black youth are still making more drug-related hospital visits per capita, since they are 1/7th the white population, but equal 1/3rd the rate of white admissions.

    And this my friends is another botched case of statistical reporting without raw figures and ham journalism.

    [emphasis added for effect. I’m lacking sensationalist headlines today]

    How so? The article was not saying one group is better or worst because they do more drugs. They are making the argument that the drug war disproportionately affects one group and that legislation presented to curb one problem in reality actually further perpetuates the problem. And enforcement is selective.

    Let us use your numbers and logic.

    # of whites : # of blacks = 7:1

    Assuming hospital rates are total and not per capita

    drug-related hospital visits - white : black = 3:1

    therefore expected ratio of arrested for drug-related offences - white:black = 7/3 : 1

    And yet the actual ratio in some states - white:black+brown+other=1:5 to 1:10

    You really need a refresher in statistics if you think this doesn’t reflect some inherent bias (intentional or otherwise) on behalf of those responsible for arresting and prosecuting these offenders.

    That article also says, “There are more African Americans under correctional control today — in prison or jail, on probation or parole — than were enslaved in 1850, a decade before the Civil War began.”

    In 1850 America’s population was only 23 million people. It’s over TEN TIMES that. Correspondingly, no shit there are now more black people in correctional facilities. There are also now more gay people, more of latinic origin, and more of everything.

    I just don’t see what point you’re trying to make. That this statistic is irrelevant? Fair enough. Of course that doesn’t really take away from any of the other arguments. It’s part of a broader narrative, excerpted from the book. You essentially found one sentence in this article that is irrelevant. Alright. How exactly does it weaken her other arguments?

     

     drugs  laws  crime  public policy  US 

  7. The drug war has been brutal — complete with SWAT teams, tanks, bazookas, grenade launchers, and sweeps of entire neighborhoods — but those who live in white communities have little clue to the devastation wrought. This war has been waged almost exclusively in poor communities of color, even though studies consistently show that people of all colors use and sell illegal drugs at remarkably similar rates. In fact, some studies indicate that white youth are significantly more likely to engage in illegal drug dealing than black youth. Any notion that drug use among African Americans is more severe or dangerous is belied by the data. White youth, for example, have about three times the number of drug-related visits to the emergency room as their African American counterparts.
     

     drugs  drug war  public policy  inequalities 

  8. micek:

    Fantastic article on what ‘Scientific Consensus’ means and how we can/should treat it

     

     science  polls  public policy  education  politicians  scientists  politics 

  9. coverspy:

Drug War Politics, Eva Bertram et al. (F, 20s, short black hair, lip stud, green fingerless mittens, G train) http://bit.ly/aLKrOl

Google Books link for Drug War Politics

    coverspy:

    Drug War Politics, Eva Bertram et al. (F, 20s, short black hair, lip stud, green fingerless mittens, G train) http://bit.ly/aLKrOl

    Google Books link for Drug War Politics

     

     books  drugs  crime  legislation  public policy 

  10. clingtomymouth:

    bonesarecoralmade:

    Arresting sex workers is easy, we make very good scapegoats as most often we cannot assert our rights and speak out. When will those in authority finally recognize that accepting our work is work is the only way to solve the problems in our industry? Instead they prefer to profit from fining us … think about how much money is taken from us year after year…how much is earned in our name … how many eat from the fruits of our labour? Are migrant sex workers especially good to arrest because we have a price on our heads? The law provides for awarding cash rewards to those that inform on and for those who arrest undocumented migrants.

    When laws are given more importance than human rights then we cannot access our rights. Laws become a barrier to the achievement of human rights, especially for undocumented migrant sex workers in Thailand. The laws do not protect us the laws only punish us and leave us open to exploitation. How do we assert our rights when the laws against us are so numerous and so strong? Sex workers, both migrant and non-migrant, do not want to break any law but we cannot accept to sacrifice our human rights especially in favour of unjust laws that are used against us for promotion and exploitation.

    Raids … who wins who loses…or is it all for show? « Asia Pacific Network of Sex Worker$

     

     immigration  economics  public policy 

  11. I’ve been doing some research on whether privatization actually saves money…

    robot-heart-politics:

    It’s a big talking point, but I’ve seen little other than rhetoric in its favor. So I’m trying to find studies, statistics, anything that point to the idea that privatization really is a more cost effective solution or that indicate just the opposite.

    How Does Privatization Affect Efficiency, Productivity And Technology Choice?: Evidence From Turkey: “The results indicate that privatization has a positive and significant effect on labor productivity and output while it has a negative and significant effect on per unit costs and prices.”

    That’s really the only concrete thing I could find this morning. Anyone else got other references?

    This is something I’m interested in as well. Unfortunately, being out of school, I no longer have glorious journal access. If anyone still has proxy access through their university/college and wouldn’t mind retrieving a few articles for me, that’d be swell (mainly science and public policy stuff). In the meanwhile, here’s a few articles on the subject (with references which seem like a good starting point):

    Cost, Performance Studies Look at Prison Privatization - National Institue of Justice

    Does Private Sector Participation Improve Performance in Electricity and Water Distribution? - Public-Private Infrastructure Advisory Facility / The World Bank

     

     statistics  privitization  public policy  infrastructure 

  12. With the help of communities secreatary John Denham , the British government is setting up an panel of religious leaders to advise on public policy decisions. Over at the Guardian, Anthony Grayling takes this truly bad idea apart with a series of rhetorical questions, e.g.:

    And what, Mr Denham, of the rule of law as this will be viewed by your faith advisers? Is each citizen of this country equal before the same law for all, or will injustice and discrimination thrive behind the closed doors of faith-based courts? Are each of the faiths to be allowed exceptions and exemptions – for example, so that any faith school can exclude well-qualified teachers because they do not share the ancient superstition with which a particular school seeks to brainwash small children’s minds?

    Also Mr Denham, why is your policy so discriminatory in itself? What of the Buddhists, the Zoroastrians, the Mother Goddess worshippers? What of the Druids, the White Witches, the Pagans, the astrologers, the Satanists? Are these not “faith groups” whose outlooks have precisely as much credibility and evidence-base as the Christians and Muslims? Are you going to include them and give them some of our tax money too? Can I start an “I Believe in Fairies” church and can I come to your meetings and get some government hand-outs too? If not, why not?

    Source: Why Evolution is True

     

     religion  public policy